Category Archives: Chinese writing

Correction marks in the Dunhuang manuscripts

With their span of six hundred some years, the Dunhuang manuscripts are a valuable witness of the process of textual transmission in medieval China. Beside looking at this process from the perspective of texts and their many versions or editions, … Continue reading

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Taboo characters in Buddhist manuscripts from Dunhuang

This is an article that came out in China so the font is a bit–but it is still readable. In the article, I examine how consistently imperial name taboos were observed in Buddhist texts from Dunhuang. Many scholars in the … Continue reading

Posted in Character variants, Chinese writing, Dating, Dunhuang, Orthography, Palaeography, published papers, Scribal habits | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Odd variants in a Buddhist manuscript

There is a Dunhuang copy of the Da fangbian Fo baoenjing 大方便佛報恩經 (The sutra of requiting kindness) at the National Library of China (shelfmark BD01534) which has a number of interesting character variants. One of them is the character 爾 … Continue reading

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Grid lines in medieval Chinese scrolls: Functionality or design?

Medieval manuscript scrolls are often ruled with grid lines to guide the hand of the calligrapher. These lines are a basic feature of most standard Buddhist and Taoist scrolls, which typically have 17 characters per line and 27-28 (or 31) … Continue reading

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The earliest Chinese manuscript corrections

The Houma covenant texts (Houma mengshu 侯馬盟書) are a large group of jade and stone tablets from the early 5th century BC. Accordingly, they are 2,500 years old and were written approximately during the last years of the life of Confucius. … Continue reading

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Graphic variability in a Ming printed book

Lately, I have been working with Ming editions of Zhuge Kongming Xinshu 諸葛孔明心書, a military text attributed to Zhuge Liang but which is most likely an early Song forgery. The earliest edition I was able to inspect was a moveably type … Continue reading

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Reversed inscriptions: Chinese writing going from left to right

I have come across an inscription which is read in reversed order, that is, from left to right. This is a famous inscription called Mogaoku ji (Record of the Mogao Caves) on the wall of the antechamber of Cave 156 … Continue reading

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Manuscript copies of stone inscriptions

Putting some of my older publications online: Manuscript copies of stone inscriptions in the Dunhuang corpus: Issues of dating and provenance (Imre Galambos) Asiatische Studien/Études Asiatiques LXIII, 4, 2009: 809-826. Abstract Modern observers tend to simplify the complex process of … Continue reading

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Scribal Notation in Medieval Chinese Manuscripts

Putting some of my older publications online: Scribal Notation in Medieval Chinese Manuscripts: The hewen (Ligature) and the chongwen (Duplication) Marks (by Imre Galambos) Manuscript Cultures (2010), No. 2. Early Chinese manuscripts and inscriptions often make use of two devices … Continue reading

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Chinese seals in Ireland

Putting online some of my older publications: The story of the Chinese seals found in Ireland (Imre Galambos) Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, Series 3, 18, 4 (2008), pp. 465-479. In 1850, a paper was read before the Royal … Continue reading

Posted in 19th century, Chinese writing, Dating, History of scholarship, published papers, Seals | Tagged , | Leave a comment