Tag Archives: manuscripts

Manuscripts and printing: East Asia

Imre Galambos, “Manuscripts and printing – East Asia.” In Jonathan A. Silk and Stefano Zacchetti, eds., Brill’s Encyclopedia of Buddhism. Leiden: Brill, 2015, 968–978. Although historically East Asia has been an arena where ethnically and politically diverse states alternated with one another, … Continue reading

Posted in archaeology, books, Buddhism, Codicology, Dunhuang, printing, published papers, Scribal habits | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

She association circulars from Dunhuang

“She association circulars from Dunhuang.” In Antje Richter, ed., History of Chinese Epistolary Culture. (Handbuch der Orientalistik.) Leiden: Brill, 2015: 853–877. This is an article published in Antje Richter’s volume on the history of Chinese epistolary culture, which is a … Continue reading

Posted in Character variants, Codicology, Dating, Dunhuang, Mistakes, Orthography, Palaeography, Scribal habits | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

Punctuation marks in medieval Chinese manuscripts

This article about punctuation marks mainly in the Dunhuang manuscripts came out recently. It is sort of an inventory of the most important types of marks used in the manuscripts, although it is certainly not complete in its scope. Imre … Continue reading

Posted in Codicology, Corrections, Dunhuang, Palaeography, published papers, Punctuation | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Correction marks in the Dunhuang manuscripts

With their span of six hundred some years, the Dunhuang manuscripts are a valuable witness of the process of textual transmission in medieval China. Beside looking at this process from the perspective of texts and their many versions or editions, … Continue reading

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Taboo characters in Buddhist manuscripts from Dunhuang

This is an article that came out in China so the font is a bit–but it is still readable. In the article, I examine how consistently imperial name taboos were observed in Buddhist texts from Dunhuang. Many scholars in the … Continue reading

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Grid lines in medieval Chinese scrolls: Functionality or design?

Medieval manuscript scrolls are often ruled with grid lines to guide the hand of the calligrapher. These lines are a basic feature of most standard Buddhist and Taoist scrolls, which typically have 17 characters per line and 27-28 (or 31) … Continue reading

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The earliest Chinese manuscript corrections

The Houma covenant texts (Houma mengshu 侯馬盟書) are a large group of jade and stone tablets from the early 5th century BC. Accordingly, they are 2,500 years old and were written approximately during the last years of the life of Confucius. … Continue reading

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Sir Aurel Stein, Lajos Ligeti and a case of mistaken identity

Putting online some of my older publications: Another Hungarian looting China’s treasures? Sir Aurel Stein, Lajos Ligeti and a case of mistaken identity (Imre Galambos) Tonkō shahon kenkyū nenpō 敦煌写本研究年報, no. 4 (March 2010): 195-207. The voluminous publication Zhonghua minguo … Continue reading

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A mysterious manuscript about the discovery of Dunhuang manuscripts

The mysterious manuscript referred to in the title is a little notebook written in a cursive caoshu hand and is currently located at the Gansu Provincial Library. The title Dunhuang xianhua 敦煌闲话 (Idle Chat about Dunhuang) is included in the notebook so … Continue reading

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