Author Archives: imre

The Bilingual Manuscript with the Irk Bitig

My paper on the tenth-century Old Uyghur codex known as Irk Bitig (Irq Bitig) is finally out. It is in a fantastic volume edited by Michael Clarke and Máire Ní Mhaonaigh, called Medieval Multilingual Manuscripts: Cases Studies from Ireland to … Continue reading

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New paper: Travel writings in Republican China

My new paper is out — at least digitally: “Foreign Travel Writings in Republican China.” Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, Series 3, 1–22. AbstractThis article examines a collection of manuscripts of travel writings kept in the National Library of … Continue reading

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Dunhuang Studies Conference – Cambridge 2019

We just finished the Dunhuang Studies Conference held at St. John’s College, Cambridge on 17-18 April 2019. This was a major event, the first such conference in Cambridge. It was organised by the Faculty of Asian and Middle Eastern Studies … Continue reading

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Graphic variation in early Chinese writing

Imre Galambos, “Graphic variation in early Chinese writing.” In Gábor Kósa, ed., China Across the Centuries: Papers from a Lecture Series in Budapest. Budapest: Department of East Asian Studies, Eötvös Loránd University, 2017, 33–59. Reading Warring States manuscripts we are … Continue reading

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Confucius and Laozi at the altar

Imre Galambos, “Confucius and Laozi at the altar: Reconsidering a Tangut manuscript.” Studies in Chinese Religions (2016) 2.3, 237–264. In the Russian collection of Tangut material there is a manuscript which describes a meeting between Confucius and an old sage. It is generally … Continue reading

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Sir Gerard Clauson and his Skeleton Tangut Dictionary

Imre Galambos, “Introduction: Sir Gerard Clauson and his Skeleton Tangut Dictionary.” Gerard Clauson’s Skeleton Tangut (Hsi Hsia) Dictionary. With an Introduction by Imre Galambos, with an Index by Andrew West; Facsimile Edition Prepared by Michael Everson. Corpus Textorum Tangutorum, v. … Continue reading

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Composite manuscripts in medieval China: The case of scroll P.3720 from Dunhuang

Imre Galambos, “Composite manuscripts in medieval China: The case of scroll P.3720 from Dunhuang.” In Michael Friedrich and Cosima Schwarke, eds., One-Volume Libraries: Composite Manuscripts and Multiple Text Manuscripts. Berlin: de Gruyter, 2016, 355–378. Manuscript Pelliot chinois 3720 (hereafter: P.3720) … Continue reading

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A snapshot of Dunhuang studies, circa 2016

Imre Galambos, “A snapshot of Dunhuang Studies, Circa 2016.” Orientations (2016) 47.4, 33–38. The Dunhuang manuscripts were discovered in the summer of 1900 in a sealed-off cave within the Buddhist cave-temple complex (also known as Qianfodong, or ‘Thousand Buddha Caves’), at Mogao, near the … Continue reading

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Scribbles on the verso of manuscripts written by lay students in Dunhuang

Imre Galambos, “Scribbles on the verso of manuscripts written by lay students in Dunhuang.” Tonkō shahon kenykū nenpō 敦煌寫本硏究年報 (2016) 10, 497–522. The vast corpus of Dunhuang manuscripts includes a series of items with what we may call ‘educational texts’ … Continue reading

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Confucian education in a Buddhist environment

Imre Galambos, “Confucian education in a Buddhist environment: Medieval manuscripts and imprints of the Mengqiu.” Studies in Chinese Religions (2015) 1.3, 269–288. Although most of the surviving collections of medieval manuscripts and imprints are of Buddhist nature, they normally include a … Continue reading

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